Spiritual Intelligence, Work-Family Conflict and Psychological Distress among University Teachers
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Keywords

Spiritual Intelligence, work-family conflict, psychological distress, university teachers

Abstract

The current study intended to explore the relationship of spiritual intelligence, work-family conflict and psychological distress among university teachers. A sample of 100 university teachers (50 males, 50 females) was recruited within the age range of 30 to 50 years using non-probability purposive sampling. It was hypothesized that there would be a relationship between spiritual intelligence, work-family conflict and psychological distress among university teachers. Spiritual Intelligence Self-Report Inventory (SISRI-24; King & DeCicco, 2009), Work-Family Conflict Scale (WFCS; Carlson, Kacmar, & Williams, 2000) and Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS 21; Lovibond & Lovibond, 1995) was used to assess spiritual intelligence, work-family conflict and psychological distress. A significant negative correlation was shown between personal meaning production (a component of spiritual intelligence) and psychological distress by Pearson Product Moment Correlation. A significant negative correlation was also present between personal meaning production and time based family interference with work (a factor of work-family conflict). There was a positive correlation between work-family conflict and psychological distress. It was concluded from the study that increased spiritual intelligence certainly decrease the probability for university teachers to undergo work-family conflict and resulting psychological distress. So, it is suggestible to incorporate spiritual intelligence fostering programs in the teachers training to reduce conflict between work and family settings and resulting psychological distress.

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